Although no-one would want to suggest that a lengthy recession is a positive thing, research-wise, it has allowed us to see what kind of things happen in an economic downturn and in particular, when consumers start to either feel or perceive their disposable income dropping.

For example, a recent article by the BBC discusses how consumers in the UK shopped in April 2009, as compared to April 2008. The results are pretty startling – sales of baked beans are up by 21.6%, budget lines by almost 23% and there is a depressing story for organic produce – as sales have decreased by 10.6% when compared to the previous year. The story is even worse for March 2009, when there was a 21.6% drop in organic sales.

The most obvious trends of customers replacing a higher-end product, with a similar but less expensive substitution is Champagne and sparkling wine – sparkling wine sales were up 9.9%, whilst sales of Champagne were down 9.0%.

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Falls in organic sales and increases in budget lines may bode poorly for the environment, but other trends may work in its favour. For example, unit sales of low-energy light bulbs have grown by 38.8% (although value has fallen due to price drops for the bulbs – from £1.25 to 87p). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, air traffic at Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Southampton airports has fallen as passenger numbers decreased 2.3% in April compared with the same month in 2008.

And people are driving less –  London’s congestion charge was paid just under 9.5 million times in the first four months of the year, which was down 9.8% on the same period last year. Similarly the number of people crossing the Severn bridge was also down, whilst railway passengers grew slightly.

Unfortunately the overall impact of these trends (both the positive and negative, for the environment) won’t emerge until the recession has ceased, but let’s hope the positives will be permanent lifestyle changes.

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