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The financial crisis is hitting but not crippling African airlines. And those that are performing poorly, particularly SAA and Kenya Airways, are doing so owing to poor hedging strategies over oil prices rather than passenger and cargo management, which for KA volumes are up 10%.focus-4

And some, like Ethiopia Airlines, are booming, up 45% this calendar year. And investments in new airports, and new hubs – in Rwanda and Swaziland, indicate the private sector share confidence in the projected 9% year-on-year expansion in passenger numbers, which is estimated by IATA.

From an economic development viewpoint, aviation has an immediate impact on land use as options for marketing produce change. Managing this change is key to dictating whether the impact of more aviation in a new place is good, sustainable and viable. Once establised, the gradual growth over time of aviation has more mixed benefits.

The transfer of technology (soft and hard) is a key enduring benefit for many developing countries. There are legitimate concerns however that this is always in the interests of the nation, the workers, and particularly smaller businesses, and the poor.

Is this resilience in the aviation sector in Africa a sign of buoyant economies, fertile trades? What role can aviation play in securing sustainable economic development in the continent?

The need for host governments with growing aviation sectors to invest rents in ensuring that development is appropriate and managed.