Anecdotal evidence suggests that in some countries around the world the recession is having an impact on the levels of carbon dioxide – a gas that plays a key role in contributing to atmospheric warming – and other greenhouse gases being emitted into the atmosphere.

In the European Union (EU), for example, a 1.5% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions has been reported for 2008 (compared to the previous year) for all 27 members of the EU, by the European Environment Agency (EEA). In addition a 1.3% reduction in the EU 15 has been reported – the 15 wealthiest and oldest members of the EU. This reduction has been attributed to lower carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion in the energy, industry and transport sectors which has occurred as a result of the economic recession.

traffic

Similarly, a study in the UK has concluded that there has been a 31% decline in traffic on motorways over the past two years. This story is likely to be similar in other developed countries that have been affected by the recession and where car ownership and use is high. The fall in traffic in the UK is thought to be due to falling numbers of people travelling during morning and evening rush hours as unemployment rises. In addition people who have been fortunate enough to remain employed have made cost-savings by working at home, sharing lifts with other people and using public transport.

The United Nations Environment Programme also argued that 2008 was the first year when new investments in renewable energies were greater than investments in fossil-fuelled technologies.

Whilst these changes may bring some temporary respite for the environment, evidence suggests that as the economic crisis wanes old patterns will be re-established. However, if the recession has provided ample opportunity and motivation for investment in renewable energy in order to replace fossil-fuel based energy use then the recession may well have provided just one, although not insignificant, silver lining.

Advertisements